IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT COMMENTS

COMMENTS HAVE BEEN DISABLED

Because of spam, I personally moderate all comments left on my blog. However, because of health issues, I will not be able to do so in the future.

If you have a personal question about LI or any related topic you can send me an email at stevecarper@cs.com. I will try to respond.

Otherwise, this blog is now a legacy site, meaning that I am not updating it any longer. The basic information about LI is still sound. However, product information and weblinks may be out of date.

In addition, my old website, Planet Lactose, has been taken down because of the age of the information. Unfortunately, that means links to the site on this blog will no longer work.

For quick offline reference, you can purchase Planet Lactose: The Best of the Blog as an ebook on Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com. Almost 100,000 words on LI, allergies, milk products, milk-free products, and the genetics of intolerance, along with large helpings of the weirdness that is the Net.

Monday, December 25, 2006

Post Punk Vegans

I wrote about the new cookbook Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World back on November 29.

I didn't realize I was only giving you half the story.

Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero were the co-hosts of a public access vegan cooking show, The Post Punk Kitchen. Well, four episodes, at least, which are still available via Google video.



And the Vegan Cupcake book is a sequel to Isa's cookbook from last year, Vegan with a Vengeance: Over 150 Delicious, Cheap, Animal-Free Recipes That Rock.

Want more? Isa and Terry and the rest of the Post Punk Kitchen crew have a website, theppk.com with recipes, forums, links to this and that, and the usual good stuff that comes with the freedom of being able to put everything out for the public.

Vegan with a Vengeance is available through their website, of course, or through my Milk-Free Bookstore on the Vegan Cookbooks page.

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