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Thursday, April 10, 2008

Top Ten Bestsellers - #2

(For more info, see The Milk-Free Bookstore's Top Ten Bestsellers.)

The Milk-Free Kitchen: Living Well Without Dairy Products
by Beth Kidder



Holt Paperbacks (September 15, 1991)
480 pages
List price: $19.95

From Publishers Weekly
For people afflicted with either dairy allergies or lactose intolerance, substitution has long been the buzzword in cooking. Here Kidder, a biological researcher, shows readers how to use fruit juices, soy milk and tofu in place of dairy products. The result: tasty and satisfying dips and main courses (although many home cooks may not take kindly to some of the soups, which employ canned condensed soups as bases). The biggest challenge is posed by dairy-free baked goods, and Kidder offers many nominations: dairy-free Sacher torte, carrot cake, chocolate mousse, pancakes, waffles, puddings and frostings. She also gives advice on ordering meals in restaurants and on plane trips, and provides a list of food products to avoid, from the most obvious--milk--to the much less so. It would have been helpful to include food breakdowns and calorie counts, as well as a discussion of how to get dietary calcium often lacking in people who follow dairy-free diets. Because some lactose-intolerant folks can tolerate cheeses made from goat's and sheep's milk, several recipes call for these ingredients.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author
Beth Kidder lives in central Illinois and has worked as a research technician. She is the mother of two grown children, both of whom are allergic to milk.


Comments
• No longer have to wonder "What's for Dinner?"

• I've used this book for four years!!!

• Great book if you like to bake!

• The Best of the Milk-Free Cookbooks


Find it on the Milk- and Lactose-Free Books and Cookbooks page in my Milk-Free Bookstore.

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