IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT COMMENTS

Because of spam, I personally moderate all comments left on my blog. That means you will not see your comment when you post it. It will instead show up within 48 hours, along with my response if one is appropriate.

All comments are welcome and will be posted, even if they are negative. You just can't promote other sites or products in them.

If you have a personal question about LI or any related topic you can send me an email at stevecarper@cs.com.

Otherwise, this blog and my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse are now legacy sites, meaning that I am not updating them any longer. The basic information about LI is still sound. However, product information and weblinks may be out of date.

My old website can be found at www.stevecarper.com/li

For quick offline reference, you can purchase Planet Lactose: The Best of the Blog as an ebook on Smashwords.com or Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com or a whole lot of other places that Smashwords is suppose to distribute the book to. Almost 100,000 words on LI, allergies, milk products, milk-free products, and the genetics of intolerance, along with large helpings of the weirdness that is the Net.

Thursday, November 15, 2007

Studentz Ar Dumm

Good grief. Patricia Kirk of WebMD.com reported on a new study by the University of Michigan Health System (UMHS). It found that 42% of students with a known food allergy still ate foods that contained that ingredient.

Why?

[R]esearchers were given answers such as: "I thought I could eat around it," "The food item did not contain enough to cause a reaction," "I knew it could be treated," or "I've outgrown my allergy," says Matthew Greenhawt, MD, a pediatrician and fellow in the division of allergy & clinical immunology at UMHS.


Greenhawt added that:
"Many of these students are accustomed to their parents being in charge of their health care. Now that they're in college, they have to take this responsibility for themselves."

How big doofuses are these students?
Only 22% of students who reported a history of allergic reaction said they possessed a self-injectable device, such as an EpiPen or Twinject, to treat a severe reaction. About 28% of those who have one say they always carry it with them. Of the 55 students reporting a severe reaction to a food allergen in the past, 27 of them did not have the device.

Blame all around on this one. Parents, schools, doctors. And the doofuses themselves, who if they are old enough for college are old enough to know better.

Bookmark and Share

No comments: