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Monday, February 11, 2008

New Kids' Allergies DVDs from FAAN

First parents had no tools to help their children learn how to cope with food allergies, then we progressed to books. This, in a world in which Sesame Street is so old that it's earliest programs can't be shown to kids today (because they contain material that's considered too dangerous! And just in case you think I'm kidding, Sesame Street... For Adults Only?).

Why not animation and DVDs?

Apparently, that's what FAAN, the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, thought. Well, to be fair, the first Alexander the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts video came out a full ten years ago, and spawned (can elephants spawn?) an empire of 13 books which now are leading back to more videos. On DVDs. Of course there's a press release.

The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) is proud to announce the release of two animated DVDs that both entertain and educate children about food allergies. Alexander, the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts ... Goes to School and Alexander, the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts ... Gets a Babysitter help children cope with their own allergies and teach other children about tolerance. Both videos combine colorful animation with interviews of real-life children with food allergies who talk about their experiences. ...

Alexander the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts ... Goes to School is designed to make it easier for them. Alexander faces his first day of kindergarten with trepidation, but thanks to his bus driver, Mariel, who also has an allergy, he is encouraged to tell his new classmates about his peanut allergy. As he makes his presentation to the class, he discovers that his new friends not only accept his condition, but also are eager to learn about it and help him stay safe.

Alexander, the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts ... Gets a Babysitter deals with a common worry that children with food allergies face: being left in the care of someone other than their parents. They are anxious about whether someone else can keep them safe from harmful foods and will know what to do in an emergency. Alex discovers just how much fun having a babysitter can be after his parents teach her all about his food allergies.

...

The original and current Alexander DVDs are produced by Susan Leavitt of Time Frame Productions, Inc., who has produced all of FAAN's educational videos. The animators are Bill and Colleen Davis of Artbear Pigmation, who have worked on projects for Sesame Street, Reading Rainbow, and Nickelodeon, among many other clients. The newly released DVDs were funded by an educational grant from Triad Foundation. Alexander DVDs can be ordered at www.foodallergy.org or (800) 929-4040.

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