The Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse Has Moved.

My old website can be found at www.stevecarper.com/li I am no longer updating the site, so there will be dead links. The static information provided by me is still sound.

For quick offline reference, you can purchase Planet Lactose: The Best of the Blog as an ebook on Smashwords.com or Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com or a whole lot of other places that Smashwords is suppose to distribute the book to. Almost 100,000 words on LI, allergies, milk products, milk-free products, and the genetics of intolerance, along with large helpings of the weirdness that is the Net.

I suffer the universal malady of spam and adbots, so I moderate comments here. That may mean you'll see a long lag before I remember to check the site and approve them. Despite the gap, you'll always get your say. I read every single one, and every legitimate one gets posted.


Saturday, November 28, 2009

FAAN's New Look

I mention FAAN, the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network often, because it's a major source of information. They've modernized the look of their website and made it a bit easier to find information.

Their Milk page has just a few basics on it, but it does confirm some things I've been telling people for years, like this:

Do these ingredients contain milk?
We frequently receive calls about the following ingredients. They do not contain milk protein and need not be restricted by someone avoiding milk:

•Calcium lactate
•Calcium stearoyl lactylate
•Cocoa butter
•Cream of tartar
•Lactic acid (however, lactic acid starter culture may contain milk)
•Oleoresin
•Sodium lactate
•Sodium stearoyl lactylate

The odd one out on that list is oleoresin, defined as "A naturally occurring mixture of an oil and a resin extracted from various plants, such as pine or balsam fir." In more than ten years on the Web nobody has ever asked me whether oleoresin is a dairy product and I've never seen any connection made in any product. Checking everything is, to be sure, a wise idea. Still, that's a strange entry on a frequent asked question list.

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Thursday, November 26, 2009

Thanksgiving Instruction: Enjoy

The traffic's a hassle, the families are loud and trying, the food's a trap with every mouthful.

What to do? Surround yourself with people you want to be with over a holiday. Select a few favorite foods and make them your feast. Carry lactase pills everywhere you go. Eat light, save room for a small dessert. Get home safely. Do something fun.

Kiss whoever you love.

That's my Thanksgiving. Hope it works for you.

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Wednesday, November 25, 2009

The Indian Vegan Kitchen


With all recipes dairy-free and egg-free, Madhu Gadia's Indian Vegan Kitchen cookbook is a just-in-time find for the holiday season.

Charlyn Fargo wrote in the Jamaica, W. I. Gleaner , quoting Gaida that:

"Everyone should be eating more vegetables, and they're looking for recipes that have more flavour," said Gadia, who also authored New Indian Home Cooking and has taught cooking classes.

Don't think curry when Indian food is mentioned - that's just one of many spice blends that Gadia uses in the book, which has been featured in the October issue of Oprah's O magazine. The new book is egg-free and dairy-free with quick and healthy recipes.

"I grew up surrounded with vegetarian food," she said. "In India, being vegetarian is considered 'normal' and eating meat is an anomaly. Even meat eaters eat vegetarian meals several times a week," said Gadia. "Working as a dietitian, I have seen the traditional American diet change over the last couple of decades. I live in the Midwest, where meat and potatoes are the staple, and encouraging people to eat more vegetables is a constant challenge."

Her answer is to try Indian vegetarian dishes that are full of flavour.

Product Description:
The author of New Indian Home Cooking presents a fresh take on Indian recipes for vegans, vegetarians, and anyone who loves Southeast Asian cuisine.

Renowned nutritionist and cooking instructor Madhu Gadia delivers a wonderful new recipe collection that is perfect for vegans looking for fresh ideas, as well as anyone who savors healthy, light recipes that don't compromise on authenticity. Unlike most Indian vegetarian cookbooks, this unique collection avoids dairy and eggs, highlighting vegetables, and making use of soy products and other simple substitutions. It also offers nutritional analyses, as well as notes on serving, history, and variations.

Perigee Trade Paperback
240 pages
List price: $18.95

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Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Artisanal Gluten-Free Cooking

Publisher's Weekly just gave a starred review (that's every author's dream) to Artisanal Gluten-Free Cooking: More than 250 Great-tasting, From-scratch Recipes from Around the World, Perfect for Every Meal and for Anyone on a Gluten-free Diet-- and Even Those Who Aren't by Kelli Bronski and Peter Bronski.

From their website:



Featuring more than 250 great-tasting, from-scratch recipes from around the world, perfect for every meal and for anyone on a gluten-free diet...and even those who aren't! (The Experiment, 2009)

From the back cover:

Here at last is the delectable and doable gluten-free cooking so many people with Celiac Disease, gluten intolerance or wheat allergy have been looking for.

Artisanal Gluten-Free Cooking is based on our cooking philosophy that follows four simple rules: the food should be fresh, the recipes should be simple, the meals should be made from scratch, and the food should be delicious. Our recipes span the globe, from Italian to Indian, Belgian to Mexican, and Asian to American.

Belgian Waffles, Cinnamon Rolls, Chicken Pad Thai, Curry-glazed Pork Tenderloin, Lasagna, thin crust and deep dish pizzas, Blueberry Pie, and Zucchini Cake will delight anyone following a gluten-free diet...and even those who aren't! More than 70 recipes - including breads, pastas, pizzas, and more than 20 desserts, from Chocolate Chip Cookies to Carrot Cake - showcase our intensively developed gluten-free flour blend. This is food so flavorful and enjoyable to eat that no one will know it's gluten-free. (Unless, of course, you tell them!)

The Experiment paperback
256 pages
List price: $18.95

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Monday, November 23, 2009

Dairy-Free Pumpkin Pie Recipes

What's Thanksgiving without a good old fashioned pumpkin pie? Hollow. Unfulfilling. Cool Whip-less. And what's the problem with pumpkin pie? Traditionally, the best recipes call for a can of evaporated milk, the thick concentrate made by removing most of the water from milk. That gives evaporated milk a lactose percentage about twice that of ordinary milk.

For years I sublimated my cravings with a wonderful dairy-free pumpkin pie made by Malek's Bakery in Rochester (technically in the suburb of Brighton), a kosher bakery that knows when and how to carefully remove all the dairy from a dessert. I've been avoiding dessert entirely for the past few weeks so I'm foregoing the pleasure this year. But that means the longing for the pie is all the greater.

It's not easy to substitute for evaporated milk. Most dairy-free pumpkin pie recipes will tell you to toss in low-fat lactose-free milk or soy milk or almond milk or just about anything that's liquid and lactose- or dairy-free. It's hard to imagine that these all can be made to march in lockstep in a recipe as delicate as pumpkin pie.

So I did a search to find recipes that specified one particular type of substitute, with the assumption that naming names means that the recipe has been successfully taste-tested.

The wonderfully named site MedPie.com has a recipe by a doctor, Robert Latkany, that manages to do away with the need for a dairy substitute liquid entirely, filling the hole with coconut oil and water.

The Teens With Crohn's Disease Website has a more straightforward version using vanilla Edensoy, a soy "milk."

PieChef.com uses coconut milk, a substitute that is the most commonly named alternative for evaporated milk.

One more. On the My Kid's Allergies blog, the author adapts a Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook recipe with rice milk and suggests using a Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust because it contains neither dairy nor soy. There is, of course, wheat.

Those are all the major alternatives for evaporated milk so among them you should find one that will suit your special needs. Enjoy.

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Sunday, November 22, 2009

Oprah's Favorite Vegan Cookbook

The news has taken the nation by storm, leaving a trail of broken hearts, weeping,a nd gnashing of teeth. No, not that Oprah Winfrey will be ending her show in 2011, but that Oprah won't be doing her annual Favorite Things show this year.

And yet, Oprah has been spending all year announcing favorites, so maybe we won't have to make do on scraps of hope. Huliq News has spent every waking hour parsing Oprah's every word to produce a list of Favorites.

And what's on that list? Nothing less than Oprah's Favorite Vegan Cookbook. Which is - ta, da! - The Conscious Cook: Delicious Meatless Recipes That Will Change the Way You Eat by Tal Ronnen.

Product Description
A former steak lover himself, Chef Tal struggled for years on a vegan diet that left him hungry and filled with cravings for butter and meat. By applying traditional French culinary techniques to meatless cuisine, he found that he could gratify his cravings for rich flavor and fat.

The Conscious Cook shows readers that avoiding the health risks and ethical dilemmas of eating meat and dairy does not mean sacrificing taste and appetite. This is not a cookbook of sprouts and tofu burgers, but of mouth-watering, hearty meals that keep the protein at the center of your plate. Featuring 75 original recipes that will satisfy the fussiest foodies and the most dedicated of carnivores, The Conscious Cook is a breakthrough in meatless cuisine that will revolutionize the way readers experience food.

About the Author
Chef Tal Ronnen is the most celebrated vegan chef working today. In the spring of 2008, he became known nationwide as the chef who prepared vegan meals for Oprah Winfrey's 21-day vegan cleanse. He has since catapulted to fame, catering Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi's vegan wedding, Arianna Huffington's party at the Democratic National Convention, and the first vegan dinner at the U.S. Senate.

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Saturday, November 21, 2009

Dietitian Sylvia Melendez-Klinger Spanish Video on a Lactose-Free Holiday

Lactaid, which has pitched its lactose-free milks to the African-Americana and Latino communities regularly in the past, has a new pitch to the Spanish-speaking segment of the market.

In a press release that appears in both English and Spanish versions, Sylvia Melendez-Klinger, a registered dietitian and certified personal trainer as well as founder of Hispanic Food Communications, gives tips for a high-calcium, lactose-free holiday season in a Spanish-language video.



Some tips in English:

•Include dark leafy greens such as kale and mustard, collard, broccoli and turnip greens or beans into your favorite, traditional dishes. These foods are not only good sources of calcium, but also low in fat.

•To boost your calcium intake, use canned fish such as salmon, in festive salads or pastas.

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Friday, November 20, 2009

Predicting Dairy Allergies -- With a Pendulum?

Some people are so many standard deviations removed from the norm that mockery is less the proper response than a simple dropping of the jaw in disbelief.

Take Betty Meyler, president of Ireland's UFO Society. While yesterday I noted that Allergy N I has established a clinic for allergies in Ireland, Meyler scoffs at such mainstream and scientific methods of gaining information.

In an interview with Matt Gregg of the University Observer, Meyler had this to say:

"Are you familiar with pendulums?" she suddenly interjected. ... "I have a rose quartz pendulum on a little silver chain," she continued. "For me, if I ask it a question and the answer’s 'yes', it will go round and round. If the answer’s 'no', it will go up and down. ... I can use it for anything," she explains, "from discovering if I had a milk allergy to predicting where the next UFO sighting would be. My source of information is wherever I wish it to come from. For example, if I’m doing UFO stuff, I’ll call on Commander Ashta. Commander Ashta is the commander-in-chief of the intergalactic forces."

Too bad the rest of the world didn't know about this sooner. Allergy N I could have been spared all that tiresome research. Instead we could watch the pendulum go round and round or up and down or over under sideways down.
Over under sideways down,
Backwards forwards square and round.
Over under sideways down,
Backwards forwards square and round.
When will it end, when will it end,
When will it end, when will it end.

When will it end? Please, could someone tell me?

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Thursday, November 19, 2009

First UK/Ireland Allergy Support Center

The Allergy N I Support Centre has opened in Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is the first center or even centre of its kind in the UK.
"Allergy N I is a local charity formed in 2005, to support individuals and families with serious and potentially life threatening allergies by providing education, information, support and campaigning on their behalf."

What We Do

The following activities will be held at various venues throughout N. Ireland:
Workshops for parents/carers: covering concerns and issues relevent to you and finding a way forward.

Workshops for children aged 6-10 years: brothers and sisters of the allergic child can also participate in this fun way of finding out more about allergies.

Workshops for young people aged 11-18 years: covering topical issues for allergic teens.

Meetings with relevant speakers: we extend a warm welcome to members and non-members at all of our meetings.

'Nut-Free' Halloween party for children aged 3-10 years: this is a chance for all nut allergic children to feel part of and enjoy Halloween activities in a safer environment. (As with all our activities involving younger children, at least one parent/child will be asked to remain with their child).

Regional Newsletter for members: a quarterly edition will keep everyone up-to-date with what's happening around the Province. Members are encouraged to contribute via articles, Children's Joke corner, eating out and holiday experiences etc.

Raising awareness of allergies: this wil be carried out via the media, posters, leaflets, speaking to staff and students in schools, colleges etc as well as lobbying for improved allergy services in N. Ireland.

Putting parents in touch with each other to share experiences: if you would like to speak to someone with similar experiences to you, let us know and this can be arranged.

Provide advice and support to members: This is undertaken in various ways as part of our wide range of activities.

Fundraising: as well as a means of financing our many activities this can also be used to raise awareness.

They also sell a cookbook, Parties, Picnics, and Packed Lunches.

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Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Vance's DariFree - From Here to Lagos


Although I've had it listed in my Product Clearinghouse for many years, I've never mentioned Vance's DariFree here in the Planet Lactose blog.

DariFree is a powder made without dairy or soy or rice or any of the more commonly found milk alternatives. Instead it's based on maltodextrin, a polysaccharide or long-chained sugar, that is derived from potato starch. This makes it unusually allergen-free.

DariFree™ is not only Fat-free and Cholesterol-free, it is also free of Gluten, Casein, Soy, Rice and contains no MSG.

DariFree™ is available in 19.5 oz. cans (6 quarts) and economical 25 lb. boxes (115 quarts). If you can not find DariFree™ at your favorite health or specialty food store, you can ask them to order it, or you can search for a store near you at our Retail Store Locator. You may also purchase DariFree™ from our Online Store.

DariFree™ is in powder form and ideal for pantry storage. Simply mix with water and enjoy. Once mixed, DariFree™ remains fresh at least a week with refrigeration. We recommend using our unique mixer/server/pitcher when preparing DariFree™. You can purchase the mixer/server/pitcher from our Online Store.

Vance's also has a large number of International Distributors around the world since they can only ship to customers in the United States and Puerto Rico.

And that's how DariFree came back into my consciousness, through this article from Yemisi Ogbe of Lagos on 234next.com.
How do I know that this was a good year for Obudu Delight? Because this year, I gained a new food obsession; homemade Guinea corn gruel also known as Oka Baba or very commonly and plainly called Ogi, served with unrestrained lashings of Obudu delight. Ogi is never ever referred to at our house as "pap" because frankly, the word sounds disgusting.

OK, I'll admit I didn't understand a word of that paragraph. It doesn't even help when the author explains that "Obudu Delight by the way, is the name of the honey produced in deep cloud layers in Obudu cattle ranch." Honey produced in deep cloud layers?

Anyway, here's where DariFree comes in:
My Ogi is not only served with Obudu honey, but also a generous sprinkling of some strange milk substitute called Darifree. Darifree is only probably familiar to the lactose intolerant. And I call it strange because it is almost like an illusion...this free, that free...It is allegedly free of everything bad for the sensitive constitution yet tastes quite good.

And it can be purchased at Okoli supermarket in Dolphin Estate.

Who says we're not all connected on Planet Lactose?

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Monday, November 16, 2009

LI Celebrity Alert: John Cleese


Every fanatical Monty Python enthusiast knows that the family surname of John Cleese was changed from "Cheese" when his father went off to fight in WWI. A good thing, to be sure. Who would believe a comic actor by the name of John Cheese? And if he did have that name, would he have dared emphasize it in his work? The world might have lost the Cheese Shop sketch, a member of the pantheon of comedy.

So it's ironic on several levels that John Cleese is himself lactose intolerant, as revealed in this interview with Kerry Lengel of The Arizona Republic.

I love a little chocolate, but unfortunately, as I am lactose-intolerant, I have to get dark chocolate, and so much of that ends up having milk fat in it, too. I also have a problem with gluten, so it's amazing how little I can eat these days. Or rather, how careful I have to be.

John, Mr. Cleese, that's good advice on dark chocolate. But don't worry yourself with milk fat as in ingredient. It is essentially lactose-free.

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Sunday, November 15, 2009

Cooking for Food Allergies Everyday & Gourmet


Libby Avery announced her new egg-free diary-free cookbook, Cooking for Food Allergies Everyday & Gourmet via a press release.

Libby Avery is a mother who for over 30 years has created recipes for her daughter who suffers from severe egg and dairy food allergies. Libby’s love of cooking turned into a passion to solve the dietary needs of her daughter. She wanted her daughter to experience all the things everyone else could, like birthday cakes, waffles, muffins, meatloaf, appetizers and main dishes. This cookbook offers recipes that taste like the real thing so that people suffering from these allergies don’t have to miss out on great tasting meals.

Libby experimented with ingredients and substitutions until each recipe tasted like the real thing. People living with these particular food allergies are left with one option, to eliminate egg and dairy from their diet, which ultimately eliminates many rich, creamy and “cheesy” tastes and sensations. This cookbook gives families who are dealing with egg and dairy food allergies the option to create the kind of meals they may have thought were going to be eliminated forever.

Family Friendly Publishing
257 pages
List price:$24.95

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Saturday, November 14, 2009

Webber Naturals Lactase Enzyme


WN Pharmaceuticals, Ltd. is another Canadian firm that makes a lactase enzyme product. It's called webber naturals lactase enzyme. It comes in blister packs, meaning that you pop each one out of a flat package individually. Apparently, it comes only in the triple strength 9000 FCC units. Inert ingredients are cellulose and magnesium stearate.

Wikipedia states that:

Magnesium stearate melts at about 88 °C, is not soluble in water, and is generally considered safe for human consumption[citation needed]. Because it is widely regarded as harmless, it is often used as a diluent in the manufacture of medical tablets, capsules and powders (E470b). In this regard, the substance is also useful because it has lubricating properties, preventing ingredients from sticking to manufacturing equipment during the compression of chemical powders into solid tablets; magnesium stearate is the most commonly used lubricant for tablets.

When used as a filling agent in the manufacture of capsules and tablets, such as vitamins, the source of this ingredient is typically bovine.[citation needed] However, there is an increasing number of vegetarian options in which the product specifically indicates it contains magnesium stearate from vegetable sources.


You can read a product monograph .pdf about webber naturals lactase enzyme online.

It is available from many of the same online sources as SteriMax's Dairy Free lactase enzyme so it may be orderable in the U.S. in addition to Canada.

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SteriMax's Dairy Free Brand Lactase Pills


SteriMax Inc., a Canadian pharmaceutical firm, makes Dairy Free lactase enzyme, in regular strength - 3000 FCC units - and extra strength - 4500 FCC units.

Each white, round, biconvex tablet contains 3000 FCC lactase units of ß-D-galactosidase derived from Aspergillus oryzae Non-medicinal ingredients: cellulose, colloidal silicon dioxide, povidone and magnesium stearate Store at room temperature, away from heat Available in bottles of 100

Lactase Enzyme is for you when you suffer from GAS, CRAMPS, BLOATING, or DIARRHEA caused by milk or dairy products

Dairy Free is certified Kosher
Dairy Free is listed on the Quebec Formulary


Povidone is something most of you would probably not recognize. It is a synthetic polymer used as a dispersing and suspending agent. I found on Wikipedia that:
references state that as polyvinyl pyrrolidone and its derivatives are fully from mineral synthetic origin. Therefore, its use in the production should not be a problem for vegans.


The Extra Strength tablets are available only in bottles of 80.

Dairy Free Lactase Enzyme is available though a number of online Canadian suppliers. Some of them may ship to the U.S.

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Friday, November 13, 2009

LI Links - US

I've updated my LI Links page in my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. I've culled the dead links, so all the links are currently live. Many are new to the page.

The links go to pages that deal with every topic that I cover on this blog, so they include not just pages on lactose intolerance, but also ones on allergies, dairy-free foods, other diseases, getting calcium int your diet, and much more.

For your convenience I'm also listing them here. This post is for links that apply to the US, although a few go farther afield than that. If you have others to suggest that I've missed please put them in a comment. I'll try to update the LI Links page more regularly in the future.

U.S. Links

AllergySupport.org

http://www.allergysupport.org/

American Gastroenterological Association - Lactose Intolerance>

http://www.gastro.org/wmspage.cfm?parm1=854

Avoiding Milk Protein/Cooking without milk

http://www.avoidingmilkprotein.com/

Calcium

http://www.indiadiets.com/foods/food_nutrients/Minerals/Calcium.htm

Calcium Counseling Resource

http://www.nationaldairycouncil.org/NationalDairyCouncil/Nutrition/Nutrients/calciumCounselingPage1.htm

Calcium Metabolism

http://www.nationaldairycouncil.org/NationalDairyCouncil/Health/Digest/dcd69-1Page1.htm

Calcium Supplements

http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/humannutrition/_timely/CALCIUM.htm

Celiac Support Page

http://www.celiac.com

Choosing an Infant Formula

http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/infant/infant_formula.html

Chronic Constipation and Encopresis in Children

http://www.hsc.virginia.edu/uvahealth/peds_growth/encopres.cfm

The Cooks Thesaurus: Non-dairy Milks & Creams

http://www.switcheroo.com/Nondairy.html

Dairy-Free Market

http://www.dairyfreemarket.com/

Dairy-free (and Lactose-free) Products

http://www.fastq.com/~jbpratt/recipes/dairyfree/acceptableproducts.html

Dairy-Free Recipes

http://allrecipes.com/recipes/healthy-cooking/Dairy-Free/Main.aspx

Dairy-Free Equivalents Recipes

http://www.healthdiaries.com/eatthis/dairy-free-reci/

Dairy-Free Recipes for Kids

http://dairyfreecooking.about.com/od/kidfriendlymealssnacks/KidFriendly_Meals_Snacks.htm

Dodging Dairy: Handling Food Allergies

http://www.sdearthtimes.com/et0595/et0595s4.html

Eating Without Casein

http://web.mit.edu/kevles/www/nomilk.html

Encopresis

https://health.google.com/health/ref/Encopresis

Food Allergies and Intolerances in Babies and Children

http://www.babyandkidallergies.com

Food Allergy - MedlinePlus

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/foodallergy.html

The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network

http://www.foodallergy.org/

Galactosemia Resources and Information

http://www.galactosemia.com/

A Gluten & Casein Free Diet: An Experimental Intervention For Autism

www.princeton.edu/~serge/ll/gfpak.html

Gluten Free & Casein Free Diet [Autism diet]

http://www.gfcfdiet.com/

Go Dairy Free.com

http://www.godairyfree.com/

The Gluten-Free Mall

http://www.glutenfreemall.com/

Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

http://ibdcrohns.about.com/

Kirsten's Non-Dairy 100% Lactose Free Web Page

http://lactoseintolerant.org/

Kosher Supermarket

http://www.hagalil.com/shop/kosher/

Lactaid.com

http://www.lactaid.com/

Lactose-Free Recipes

http://www.recipezaar.com/recipes/lactose

Lactose Intolerance - MedicineNet

http://www.medicinenet.com/lactose_intolerance/article.htm

Lactose Intolerance - National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/lactoseintolerance/

Lactose Intolerance - Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactose_intolerance

Milk Allergy in Infants

http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/allergies/milk_allergy.html

Milk Allergy Resources

http://www.recipelink.com/milkallergy.html

Misc.kids Frequently Asked Questions – Allergies and Asthma

http://www.cs.unc.edu/~kupstas/FAQ_recipes.html

National Osteoporosis Foundation

http://www.nof.org

NoMilk Mall: Dairy-Free Products

http://nomilkmall.com/

The No Milk Page

http://www.nomilk.com/

Non-Dairy Foods for Toddlers

http://www.parentsplace.com/expert/nutritionist/qas/0,10338,166592_105312,00.html

Osteoporosis - Mayo Clinic

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/osteoporosis/DS00128/

Parve/Pareve FAQs

http://www.nomilk.com/parve.txt

Soyfoods Directory - US

http://www.soyfoods.com/

Vegan Recipe Collection

http://www.catteacorner.com/recipes.htm

Why Does Milk Bother Me?

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/lactoseintolerance_ez/

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LI Links - World

I've updated my LI Links page in my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. I've culled the dead links, so all the links are currently live. Many are new to the page.

The links go to pages that deal with every topic that I cover on this blog, so they include not just pages on lactose intolerance, but also ones on allergies, dairy-free foods, other diseases, getting calcium into your diet, and much more.

For your convenience I'm also listing them here. This post is for Multi-country and travel to multiple country links. If you have others to suggest that I've missed please put them in a comment. I'll try to update the LI Links page more regularly in the future.

World Links

Gluten Free Product Sources - Multi-Country

http://www.enabling.org/ia/celiac/vendors.html


Travel Links

Food Allergy Translation Cards

http://www.selectwisely.com/selectwisely/content_pages/traveling_with_food_allergies.htm

Vegetarian Travel and Restaurants FAQ

http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/faqtravel.htm

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LI Links - Canada

I've updated my LI Links page in my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. I've culled the dead links, so all the links are currently live. Many are new to the page.

The links go to pages that deal with every topic that I cover on this blog, so they include not just pages on lactose intolerance, but also ones on allergies, dairy-free foods, other diseases, getting calcium into your diet, and much more.

For your convenience I'm also listing them here. This post is for Canadian links. If you have others to suggest that I've missed please put them in a comment. I'll try to update the LI Links page more regularly in the future.

Canada Links

Cow's Milk

http://www.veg.ca/issues/dairy.html

Dairy Science and Technology

http://www.foodsci.uoguelph.ca/dairyedu/home.html

Gay Lea Foods - Lacteeze Recipes

http://www.gaylea.com/lacteeze/

Managing Lactose Intolerance (.pdf)

http://westernhealth.nl.ca/uploads/healthyeating/managing_lactose_intolerance.pdf

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Thursday, November 12, 2009

LI Links - United Kingdom

I've updated my LI Links page in my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. I've culled the dead links, so all the links are currently live. Many are new to the page.

The links go to pages that deal with every topic that I cover on this blog, so they include not just pages on lactose intolerance, but also ones on allergies, dairy-free foods, other diseases, getting calcium into your diet, and much more.

For your convenience I'm also listing them here. This post is for United Kingdom. If you have others to suggest that I've missed please put them in a comment. I'll try to update the LI Links page more regularly in the future.

United Kingdom Links

The Allergy Site on Lactose Intolerance

http://www.theallergysite.co.uk/dairy.html

Allergy UK

http://www.allergyuk.org/

The Allergy UK Forum

http://forum.allergyuk.org/

Cambridge World History of Food - Lactose Intolerance

http://www.cambridge.org/us/books/kiple/lactose.htm

Colief Infants Drops

http://www.colief.com/

Dairy-free Cooking - BBC

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/mostof_dairyfree.shtml

Dairy (cow's milk)-free foods index

http://www.foodsmatter.com/freefrom_foods/links_food_products/dairy_free/dffoods_index.html

Dave Elsworth's Paediatrics Lactose Intolerance Page

http://www.fortunecity.com/millenium/lala/228/lac_ind.html

Food Allergy & Intolerance (The Vegetarian Society UK)

http://www.vegsoc.org/info/allergy.html

Food Reactions.org

http://www.foodreactions.org/

Helen Stephenson's Food Page

http://www.baronmoss.demon.co.uk/food.html

Lactofree Web Site

http://www.lactofree.co.uk/

Lactose Intolerance - NetDoctor

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/lactoseintolerance.htm

Lactose Intolerance and Milk Allergies

http://www.lactose.co.uk/

Milk Allergy and Intolerance (Food Standards Agency)

http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthissues/foodintolerance/foodintolerancetypes/milkallergy/

Milkfree.org.uk

http://www.milkfree.org.uk/

No Cow's Milk for Me Thanks!

http://dialspace.dial.pipex.com/town/park/gfm11/

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LI Links - Australia and New Zealand

I've updated my LI Links page in my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. I've culled the dead links, so all the links are currently live. Many are new to the page.

The links go to pages that deal with every topic that I cover on this blog, so they include not just pages on lactose intolerance, but also ones on allergies, dairy-free foods, other diseases, getting calcium into your diet, and much more.

For your convenience I'm also listing them here. This post is for Australian and New Zealand links. If you have others to suggest that I've missed please put them in a comment. I'll try to update the LI Links page more regularly in the future.

Australian Links

Allergyfree Pty Ltd

https://www.allergyfree.com.au/

Diet for Lactose Intolerance

http://www.gastro.net.au/diets/lactose.html

A Doctor Describes Coeliac Disease

http://www.ozemail.com.au/~coeliac/sprue.html

Lactose.com.au

http://www.lactose.com.au/

Lactose intolerance and the breastfed baby

http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/lactose.html

Vegan Network Victoria

http://www.vnv.org.au/



New Zealand Links

Allergy New Zealand - Milk and Dairy

http://allergy.org.nz/allergies/aZAllergies/milk%20Dairy.php

Lactose Intolerance

http://www.everybody.co.nz/page-82eda97a-9b8c-455f-9169-d5c2225738a7.aspx

Lactose Intolerance - A Patient's Guide

http://www.medic8.com/healthguide/articles/lactoseintol.html

Lactose Intolerance and Milk Allergy

http://www.allergyclinic.co.nz/guides/21.html

'Ntolerance Allergy-Free Store

http://www.ntolerance.co.nz/

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LI Links - Europe

I've updated my LI Links page in my Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse. I've culled the dead links, so all the links are currently live. Many are new to the page.

The links go to pages that deal with every topic that I cover on this blog, so they include not just pages on lactose intolerance, but also ones on allergies, dairy-free foods, other diseases, getting calcium into your diet, and much more.

For your convenience I'm also listing them here. This post is for European links outside the UK. If you have others to suggest that I've missed please put them in a comment. I'll try to update the LI Links page more regularly in the future.


Finland Links

Valio

http://www.valio.fi/portal/page/portal/Valio


Germany Links
LI Base.de

http://www.libase.de/

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Wednesday, November 11, 2009

OmnigestEZ, A Lactase Pill


Saw this on the shelves of my local supermarket. OmnigestEZ claims to be an all-around digestive of "most all types of food: fats, protein, starch and carbohydrates, vegetables and dairy."

How does it do this? With a mix of several digestive enzymes: acid protease, amylase, cellulase, glucoamylase, lipase, and nutral protease in addition to lactase.

There are many such pills on the market, but few contain what I consider to be a useful amount of lactase. OmnigestEZ does, with 3000 FCC units, the same as most basic (not ultra) lactase pills. That justifies this statement on their FAQs.

Q: I am lactose intolerant; will OMNIGEST EZ help me?


A: Yes. OMNIGEST EZ contains the right amount of the enzyme lactase to aid in the digestion of typical meals containing dairy products.

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Monday, November 09, 2009

Milk Doesn't Cause Mucus

The claim that milk creates mucus or phlegm that may or may not be the result of a milk allergy has been around for years, so I suppose that it's not surprising that we'll need years to dispel it. I keep trying. I posted Udder Confusion in 2006 and Milk: No Mucus, No Asthma in 2007 so it's time to attack the myth yet again.

I'm getting help from Dr Raymond Mullins, an allergy specialist interviewed by Genelle Weule for ABC.net.au.

[W]hile many people swear milk produces mucus, the effect can't be explained by science, says allergy specialist Dr Ray Mullins.

A 2005 review of studies concluded that there was no link between milk consumption and mucus production or asthma. In one study, participants infected with the common cold virus reported symptoms of increased in mucus production after drinking milk, but when their mucus production was actually measured there was no statistical difference. In another study, there was no difference in the sensation experienced between drinking soy milk and cow's milk.

This doesn't mean people don't experience the sensation, says Mullins, but rather that there is no actual increase in mucus production.

He puts the sensation down to the texture and viscosity of milk, and notes that most people do not report similar effects with other dairy products such as cheese.

If you believe that milk will cause mucus, then any feelings of mucus you get from milk will simply reinforce that belief whether or not any true increase is present.

There's no scientific connection, though, nothing that can be found in theory or isolated in tests. If you can drink milk, then know the facts about it and make your own decisions based on those facts, not unfounded beliefs.

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Sunday, November 08, 2009

Nutrition for Vegetarian Children

Emily Sohn in the Los Angeles Times gave a number of good tips for ensuring that children who want to be vegetarians continue to get a full complement of the vitamins, minerals, and esential dietary components.

Some of the major points:

Protein needs range from 13 grams for toddlers to 34 grams for middle-school students and about 50 grams for teenagers. However, most Americans get too much protein, including vegetarians.

Dairy products and eggs are complete proteins that, like meat, contain all essential amino acids. These foods also provide calcium and vitamin D, essential for healthy muscles and bone development, especially during growth spurts and adolescence. One large egg contains 5 grams of protein, a cup of milk has 8 grams, and a cup of yogurt has 11 grams.

To get complete proteins from plant-based sources, you need to combine foods such as beans, rice, corn, nuts and tofu, but dietitians no longer believe that you need to eat those foods at the same meal. Eating a variety of foods throughout the day works just as well.

Vitamin B-12 is one of the nutrients that vegetarians most commonly miss. Essential for making DNA and maintaining healthy nerve and red blood cells, it is plentiful in seafood and beef and is found in lesser amounts in milk and yogurt. Vegans can get it from fortified cereals or supplements. Doctors often recommend B-12 supplements for breast-feeding mothers who are vegan.

Iron, which is abundant in meat, is present in a harder-to-absorb form in beans, tofu, spinach and raisins. Absorption is enhanced by consuming a source of vitamin C at the same time as a vegetarian source of iron, says Ruth Frenchman, a registered dietitian in Burbank and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Assn. (Pair a cup of orange juice with a peanut butter sandwich, for example.) ...

Calcium and vitamin D are found in leafy greens and fortified soy milk or juice. Make sure to look at the labels on dairy-free versions of milk and yogurt and on organic cereals because they're not always fortified with added nutrients.

Fat: A baby's brain needs enough fat to develop properly. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends full-fat versions of milk, yogurt and other foods until age 2.

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Saturday, November 07, 2009

Rolling Your Own - Probiotics

The annual international genetically engineered machines competition, the iGEM, takes place at MIT each November. Students combine small fragments of DNA and swap them into bacteria, yeasts, or other one-celled organisms to produce new variants that can do specialized tasks. They get better at this each year, as the earlier fragments, known simply as "parts," get added to a library of functions. Much the same way as programming languages accrete blocks of code that can be dropped into place so that coders don't need to solve the same problems over and over again, but can simply and easily rely on the earlier ingenuity of others.

In previous years, students have used these bacteria for such tasks as making "probiotic bacteria, like that found in yogurt, designed to fight cavities, produce vitamins, and treat lactose intolerance" according to MIT's Technology Review magazine.

For all the hype and fear about frankenfoods, genetically tailored beasties are far more likely to do us a world of good than harm. This can't guarantee that every bacteria will be perfectly functional any more than every bit of computer code is perfect. How many people would ask that all computer programs be banned or destroyed because of that tiny risk? Genetically engineered bacteria will no more plague the world than computers will band together to get rid of us. This will remain true no matter how many movies Hollywood makes.

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Friday, November 06, 2009

The BRAT Diet Made Liquid

The BRAT Diet is named after its ingredients, Bananas, Rice, Applesauce, and Toast, four foods that are so mild for most peoples' digestive tracts that they can be used to soothe troubled tummies.

Toast is a problem for those with celiac disease, of course, and many breads also include milk.

And some children have such severe problems that getting them to eat solid foods is itself an issue.

That was the problem with the children of Greg and Ilsa Toepfer. So, in a familiar tale, the couple worked to find a solution for their children. Which they are now marketing nationally.

The story by Mike Hodgson of The Adobe Press talked about the long process they went through.



Greg said. “We got the basic formula, and it tasted OK. Then we worked very closely with their scientists and designers and came out with something we really, really liked.”

The process took a year.

“It took a long time, but it’s a good thing it did because we found all these other things we could put in it that really help calm the digestive tract,” Greg said.

Some of those things include electrolytes to aid absorption, vitamins, calcium and other minerals, but to make the product gluten- and lactose-free, they removed toast from the formula.

“The ‘T’ now stands for ‘tummy-soothing,’” Greg said, noting the drink comes in four flavors — chocolate honey, vanilla, cinnamon toast and original. ...

In September, Organic B.R.A.T. was among the products showcased by some 3,500 vendors at Natural Products Expo East in Boston, where it won the New Products Showcase Award for the Most Innovative Product.

For more information visit their website at www.bratdiet.org.

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Thursday, November 05, 2009

A Reminder This Is Planet Lactose

Lactose intolerance (LI) is at its lowest in northern European countries and in populations descended from people emigrating from there. Low is not the same as zero, and a raft of articles from other countries and in various languages serve to remind everyone that the majority of humans are genetically LI and therefore we indeed live on Planet Lactose.

The following links are to the originals, but are followed by excerpts courtesy of Google Translate.

Austria

1. Lactose
Symptoms of intolerance to lactose (milk sugar =: diarrhea, bloating, abdominal cramps. Are affected up to 30 percent of the European population (compared with only three to five percent suffering) with clinically proven food allergies. Lactose is found not only in cow's milk products like cheese, but is also often accompanied by industrially produced food. In trade, there's labeled lactose-free milk and dairy products. The intolerance is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme lactase in the small intestine. With a breath test can determine this incompatibility.


Germany
To reflect the increasing number of patients with food allergies and intolerances into account, there is since 2004 a labeling regulations for packaged foods. Lactose was incorporated into a product, it must be marked on the packaging. Beware of medications: Again, may contain lactose. However, this is usually only relevant if a lactose-free diet is really necessary.


Belgium
5) Almond Milk
Advantages: it contains no saturated fat or lactose and has the least calories of all milk alternatives. It is also suitable for vegans.


France
Homemade or purchased commercially, yogurt belongs to the category of healthy foods nutritionally. It is rich in calcium (150 mg of calcium per 125g pot). It also reveals much more digestible than milk as lactose, sometimes poorly digested, is converted by enzymes. Finally, yogurt promotes good bowel. His enablers contributing in part to balance the intestinal flora, even in cases of diarrhea.

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Wednesday, November 04, 2009

Why Does Milk Bother Me?

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health. Which almost makes for a full blog post all by itself.

They have pages on many, many diseases, illnesses, and conditions, including a good page on lactose intolerance.

If you have kids suffering from LI and wonder how exactly to explain it to them, though, they have a better page aimed especially at children. Why Does Milk Bother Me? explains it all in simple language, and has cartoons to ease the eye down the page.


It's not as full an explanation as the adult one, of course, but it should help get the basics across to a youngster.

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Tuesday, November 03, 2009

Two Sides of the Raw Milk Argument

AlterNet, as the name implies, purports to give alternative views to conventional opinions, taking articles from a variety of sources in addition to original content. Alternative now apparently means looking at both sides of an issue rather than raw advocacy if The Battle Over Raw Milk: Let's Ditch the Hysterics and Give People a Choice is any evidence. Richardson is founder of the blog La Vida Locavore, a member of the Organic Consumers Association policy advisory board, and author of Recipe for America: Why Our Food System Is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It...

Although, as the title indicates, Richardson eventually finishes the article by saying that people should have the choice to drink raw milk if they want to, she does list some of the objections to raw milk. She balances that with the usual shaky anecdotal evidence for raw milk. And even reported that in "a survey of milk drinkers in the state of Michigan, over 80 percent of those advised by a health care professional that they were lactose intolerant were able to consume raw milk without problem." She doesn't seem to understand that the "survey" was a bogus one put forth by the leading raw milk advocacy organization, the Weston A. Price Foundation. The survey was only of raw milk consumers who had contracts with farmers producing raw milk, not the most impartial of populations.

Medical studies on the one side, anecdotal testimony on the other, but Richardson still comes down on the side of choice, for the straightforward reason that people should be allowed to take risks. Many states already allow people to take risks by making raw milk legal, while also trying to minimize the risk.

Which is fine, as long as everybody does understand the actual risks. As Richardson points out we eat many risky foods that no agency protects us from.

So everybody's happy, right?

Not in the least. The truly frightening part doesn't appear in the article but in the comments. (Note: many of the comments rightfully complain about a subhead that has now been removed.) Nobody there is thanking Richardson for presenting both sides of the argument. Almost universally the commenters either present their anecdotes about the wonderfulness of raw milk or excoriate her for having the audacity to present both sides. That's unfortunate.

More facts, fewer anecdotes. That's an alternative point of view I'd like to see spread across the Internet.

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Monday, November 02, 2009

Many "Milks" Comparison

What even larger than galore? I ask because a mere couple of weeks ago, I posted "Milks" Galore: Soy, Rice, Almond, and Hemp, about a Los Angeles Times comparison of different milk alternatives, along with cow's milk itself.

That apparently set off a trans-Atlantic one-upsmanship contest. The UK Daily Mail has a comparison of, deep breath now, whole cow's milk, 1% fat cow's milk, raw milk, goat's milk, sheep's milk, buffalo milk, and soy, almond, oat, and rice "milks."

And after the idiocy shown in the post I made about the firm who claimed that goat's milk had smaller lactose molecules, a chemical and physical impossibility, this article correctly points out that it is the "fat globules" in goat's milk that are smaller. Obviously, globules can be of various sizes. Molecules of lactose can't. You can tell the quacks instantly by their scientific illiteracy.

Unfortunately, the article goes on to give this statement:

This helps to avoid symptoms that can occur with cow's milk intolerance such as bloating and discomfort.

You can easily find claims by goat milk enthusiasts that the smaller fat globules make goat milk more digestible and that somehow helps people with lactose intolerance. What I can't find is a single claim that has any references to actual medical or scientific evidence for this. I also can't find any such articles in the medical literature.

Even the most honest admit that they don't know what this should be so, although that doesn't keep them from making the claim anyway.

"Raise a Glass of Nature's Goodness."
Goat’s milk contains less lactose than cow’s milk and therefore is easier to digest for those suffering from lactose intolerance. Now the interesting aspect to consider is that goat’s milk isn’t much lower than cow’s milk (contains about 10% less than cow’s milk) and yet, countless lactose intolerant patients are able to thrive on goat’s milk. Although the answer for this is unclear, it has been hypothesized that since goat’s milk is digested and absorbed in a superior manner, there is no “leftover” lactose that remains undigested which causes the painful and uncomfortable effects of lactose intolerance.

The Daily Mail article also hits a bump when it comes to the part on sheep's milk.
Like goat's milk, it has small fat globules that are easily digested by the body. ... Unsuitable for the lactose intolerant and babies.

But if it's the small fat globules that make goat's milk more easily digested, then...

I've learned never to expect consistency in claims by proponents of anything. Milk is just a particular bad example.

On the plus side, the information on the milk alternatives doesn't have these obvious faults.

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Oprah's Favorite Vegan Cookbook


I'm probably the last person in the country to find this out, but just in case not, The Conscious Cook: Delicious Meatless Recipes That Will Change the Way You Eat by Tal Ronnen is Oprah Winfrey's favorite vegan cookbook. She announced that on her annual Favorite Things show.

What was that? The show hasn't appeared yet? But we already know what her favorite things are? Oprah truly is magic!

Product Description
A former steak lover himself, Chef Tal struggled for years on a vegan diet that left him hungry and filled with cravings for butter and meat. By applying traditional French culinary techniques to meatless cuisine, he found that he could gratify his cravings for rich flavor and fat.

The Conscious Cook shows readers that avoiding the health risks and ethical dilemmas of eating meat and dairy does not mean sacrificing taste and appetite. This is not a cookbook of sprouts and tofu burgers, but of mouth-watering, hearty meals that keep the protein at the center of your plate. Featuring 75 original recipes that will satisfy the fussiest foodies and the most dedicated of carnivores, The Conscious Cook is a breakthrough in meatless cuisine that will revolutionize the way readers experience food.

About the Author
Chef Tal Ronnen is the most celebrated vegan chef working today. In the spring of 2008, he became known nationwide as the chef who prepared vegan meals for Oprah Winfrey's 21-day vegan cleanse. He has since catapulted to fame, catering Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi's vegan wedding, Arianna Huffington's party at the Democratic National Convention, and the first vegan dinner at the U.S. Senate.

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Oprah's Favorite Vegan Cookbook


I'm probably the last person in the country to hear this, but Oprah Winfrey's favorite vegan cookbook is The Conscious Cook: Delicious Meatless Recipes That Will Change the Way You Eat by Tal Ronnen. She announced this on her annual Favorite Things show during Thanksgiving Week.

Wait a second. That's still in the future. But somehow we know this already. Oprah really is magic!

Product Description
A former steak lover himself, Chef Tal struggled for years on a vegan diet that left him hungry and filled with cravings for butter and meat. By applying traditional French culinary techniques to meatless cuisine, he found that he could gratify his cravings for rich flavor and fat.

The Conscious Cook shows readers that avoiding the health risks and ethical dilemmas of eating meat and dairy does not mean sacrificing taste and appetite. This is not a cookbook of sprouts and tofu burgers, but of mouth-watering, hearty meals that keep the protein at the center of your plate. Featuring 75 original recipes that will satisfy the fussiest foodies and the most dedicated of carnivores, The Conscious Cook is a breakthrough in meatless cuisine that will revolutionize the way readers experience food.

About the Author
Chef Tal Ronnen is the most celebrated vegan chef working today. In the spring of 2008, he became known nationwide as the chef who prepared vegan meals for Oprah Winfrey's 21-day vegan cleanse. He has since catapulted to fame, catering Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi's vegan wedding, Arianna Huffington's party at the Democratic National Convention, and the first vegan dinner at the U.S. Senate.

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Oprah's Favorite Vegan Cookbook

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Sunday, November 01, 2009

Alicia Silverstone's Kind Diet

Face it, a vegan cookbook by the "Sexiest Vegetarian Alive" is going to get a lot of attention. When the author is a photogenic famous actress, the mediasphere will be burning up with fawning praise.

So I can't tell you how good Alicia Silverstone's The Kind Diet: A Simple Guide to Feeling Great, Losing Weight, and Saving the Planet might be. She's been a vegan for most of her adult life, which does mean she's not riding a fad.

Product Description

In The Kind Diet, actress, activist, and committed conservationist Alicia Silverstone shares the insights that encouraged her to swear off meat and dairy forever, and outlines the spectacular benefits of adopting a plant-based diet, from effortless weight loss to clear skin, off-the-chart energy, and smooth digestion. She explains how meat, fish, milk, and cheese—the very foods we’ve been taught to regard as the cornerstone of good nutrition—are actually the culprits behind escalating rates of disease and the cause of dire, potentially permanent damage to our ecology.

Yet going meat- and dairy-free doesn’t mean suffering deprivation; to the contrary, The Kind Diet introduces irresistibly delicious food that satisfies on every level—it even includes amazing desserts to keep the most stubborn sweet tooth happy. Alicia also addresses the nutritional concerns faced by many who are new to a plant-based diet, and shows how to cover every nutritional base, from protein to calcium and beyond.

Alicia knows that changing life-long dietary habits is a process, and that each person progresses at a different pace. For that reason, The Kind Diet encompasses 3 separate levels, from Flirting to Superhero. Flirts learn to dip a toe into the vegan pool, reducing their meat-eating and swapping out a few key foods for plant-based substitutes to see quickly how even small changes can reap big results. Vegans get to experience the life-altering effects of forgoing animal-products entirely, while still enjoying many convenience foods and meat substitutes in addition to the wonderful grains, vegetables and fruits that form the core of that diet. True enlightenment comes with the Superhero program, based on the principles of macrobiotics and built on a foundation of whole grains, vegetables, and other yummy foods that Alicia describes in detail.

Whether your goal is to drop a few pounds, boost your energy and metabolism, or simply save the world, Alicia provides the encouragement, the information, and the tools you need to make the transition to a plant-based diet deliciously empowering.

Rodale Press hardcover
320 pages
List price: $29.99

You can also go to her Kind Life blog for recipes and more.

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