The Lactose Intolerance Clearinghouse Has Moved.

My old website can be found at www.stevecarper.com/li I am no longer updating the site, so there will be dead links. The static information provided by me is still sound.

For quick offline reference, you can purchase Planet Lactose: The Best of the Blog as an ebook on Smashwords.com or Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com or a whole lot of other places that Smashwords is suppose to distribute the book to. Almost 100,000 words on LI, allergies, milk products, milk-free products, and the genetics of intolerance, along with large helpings of the weirdness that is the Net.

I suffer the universal malady of spam and adbots, so I moderate comments here. That may mean you'll see a long lag before I remember to check the site and approve them. Despite the gap, you'll always get your say. I read every single one, and every legitimate one gets posted.


Wednesday, September 12, 2007

Exclusive Breastfeeding Doesn't Reduce Asthma or Skin Allergy Risk

The word from doctors has always been that breastfeeding - exclusive breastfeeding, with no use of formula - is the best way to reduce the risk of babies developing later allergies.

That may still be true for dairy allergies, but the risk of asthma, hay fever, or eczema was not reduced at all by exclusive breastfeeding for the first three months of live, according to a new study in the journal BMJ.

An article by Peggy Peck on MedpageToday.com has more details.

Children who were exclusively breastfed for at least the first three months of life were no less likely to develop allergies or asthma than children whose nutrition included infant formulas.

Moreover, by age six, children who were nourished solely by breast milk had a two- to threefold higher risk for positive skin prick tests for four of five antigens, Michael S. Kramer, M.D., and colleagues from Montreal Children's Hospital reported in the Sept. 12 issue of BMJ.

...

For allergic symptoms and diagnosis there was "borderline significant reductions in history of eczema both with more prolonged any breastfeeding and with more prolonged exclusive breastfeeding (P=0.08 for both associations)."


However, the strongest associations were for skin prick tests and those went "in the opposite direction," said the researchers, with significant increased risk for positive tests among children who had exclusive breastfeeding for six months or longer.

However, there were some indicators that went the other way.
For allergic symptoms and diagnosis there was "borderline significant reductions in history of eczema both with more prolonged any breastfeeding and with more prolonged exclusive breastfeeding (P=0.08 for both associations)."

Since this study did not look at dairy protein based allergies, presumably exclusive breastfeeding is still the best route to lower future risk. However, this is an interesting finding that will certainly generate more studies.

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1 comment:

Claire said...

"However, the strongest associations were for skin prick tests and those went "in the opposite direction," said the researchers, with significant increased risk for positive tests among children who had exclusive breastfeeding for six months or longer..."

I have often wondered (from a position of more or less complete ignorance, I hasten to add!) if being breastfed by an atopic mother with high IgE levels might increase the risk of allergic sensitisation.